HR and Diversity

Another really good post from Sukh. My organisation is one that has a huge level of diversity across most of it areas of work, including HR, which I have noticed for us means that we don’t often talk able diversity, simply because it is part of our day to day life, our corporate DNA so to speak. What I do find interesting is that Sukh has hit the nail on the head, when I think about my networks and connections and the conferences I attend outside of the organisation. We are all for the most past, either white middle aged men or women. I am not sure however that this means that diversity doesn’t matter to HR or that if diversity did matter HR would look very different. It might mean that as a profession we are not working hard enough to encourage people from diverse backgrounds not only to enter the profession but to want to share their experiences at conferences and such and work towards leadership roles. I agree that we should reach out more and do more to encourage people from diverse backgrounds and not just for legislative reasons or the like, but because highly diverse workplaces can really encourage different ways of thinking and doing things.

Thinking About Learning

After an enjoyable couple of days at the CIPD Annual Conference and Exhibition, I’m quite buoyed about the growing understanding amongst HR professionals to innovate their practice, and how to make their practice more human centred. There were great stories from companies who insist on their managers being of the same level and with no extra pay than the people reporting into them, stories of companies who gave their staff breakfast everyday, stories of purposeful mentoring programmes to help women achieve senior levels, and stories of how to cultivate managers to be their best authentic selves.

And as I reflect, I’m struck at just how far down the agenda diversity is. Not in terms of the conference or exhibition – there were a good range of topics to address diversity, and a good number of exhibitors who were concerned about raising awareness of various topics about diversity.

Here are the…

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About pauldrasmussen
Paul Rasmussen is one of Australia’s most widely read Vocational Education and Training Commentators. He provides deep, unbiased analysis and insights not only on topical issues, but also on the underlying structure and policy which supports the industry. His writing and analysis has been praised for its uncompromising and thought provoking style and its ability to focus on the issues of real importance to the sector. He has advised various government departments and ministers, training providers, public and private organisations, not for profits and small to medium enterprises on the VET sector and the issues and opportunities facing it. He is one of Australia’s most awarded learning professionals and a regular speaker at a range of conventions and forums. His extensive experience in vocational education, and learning and development coupled with formal qualifications in philosophy, ethics, business and education management allow Paul to provide a unique view of the road ahead and how to navigate it.

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