Can we improve online completion rates in VET

So as most of you are probably aware we are seeing evidence of very low completion rates for online learning programs in the VET sector in this country.  Indications early in 2015 were that those students studying in online only mode had completion rates of around 7%, as opposed to around 40% for those students which undertook classroom or workplace based training where there was shall we say face to face components of the training.  It is now being suggested that in reality online completion rates may be as low as 2% for a significantly worrying number of providers, with even strong providers having great difficulty reaching a completion rate of even 20% which is half that of general completion rates.

This situation raises a couple of questions for me;

  • Is online learning suitable for VET programs,
  • How do VET completion rates stack up against other online completion rates,
  • Why are rates so low, and
  • What can we do, if anything, to raise completion rates to a more acceptable level.

Before I go on I am going to put my heart on my sleeve and say that I am not a great believer in, in particular, online only programs in the VET sector.  Does this mean that I think that online learning has no place in VET, no.  What it means is that this is a competency based system, we all know that, and I have concerns that both for students and for assessors in online only courses proving that competency in a way that meets the required standards, while possible is I think far more difficult than in other environments.  I think that online learning in the context of VET qualifications may be useful when it comes to developing and assessing the knowledge components of a unit of competency, but where I have issues with it is in the development and assessment of the actual performance components, where more and more even in areas like community services we are seeing assessment criteria which say thing like ‘has provided information to 3 different clients accessing the service.’ How does one evidence and assess that through an online learning environment in any way which might simulate a real work environment.

Additionally (and it is important to note that this is anecdotal) it seems that at least a significant proportion of VET students who enter into online only training do not actually have a good idea of what they are signing up to do, the amount of work they will be required to undertake and the difficulty associated with working independently of other students and the other advantages of classroom based learning environments.  I have seen first hand a large number of students start as online students only to come back in a very short time frame and indicated that while they are happy to do the assessments online, they want to come to class, as they are having difficulties engaging with the materials and the assessments without that environment.

The next question is then how do the completion rates for VET courses compare with other online only programs.  If we look at MOOC’s in a higher education setting for example we see that completion rates seem to sit at around 7% which is it comparable, however we need to be careful with this figure because there is something interesting going on here.  The completion rate of 7% relates to MOOC’s where there course is provided at no charge to the participant and the participant receives only a statement of attendance.  There appears to be mounting evidence that when even a small fee is charged by the provider, ostensibly to provide the participant with a certified certificate of successful completion, that there is a significant increase in completion rates for those who choose to pay the fee.  Now given that VET students are paying quite a large fee for the privilege of completing their Nationally Accredited Training online one would think that therefore, if we look at the MOOC experience that there would be a fairly solid completion rate, but this seems not to be the case.

This then leads on to the next question, why are completion rates so low in the VET sector.  Firstly I think that if we relate this to the payment issue, unlike those paying to undertake MOOC’s, what would seem to be a significant number of VET participants have been sold the course on the ‘Study now, Pay later’ premise so that they do not feel like they have any financial commitment in the programs so if they don’t finish it, it doesn’t matter.  This is of course not the case with VET FEE HELP debts incurring on census date rather than on completion, so even if they do not complete the course  they still incur the debt.  While I think the issue of financial commitment to undertaking the course certainly has an impact on students mindsets in relation to completion, it is certainly not the only issue.  In addition there are certainly a range of other factors including;

  1. Lack of real learning support,
  2. Badly designed content (Often the content is very similar to in class content just provided in an online environment),
  3. Low digital literacy levels in students,
  4. Inappropriate courses for students (Students being enrolled in a Diploma when they would be better served by a Certificate level program),
  5. Complexity of both the learning material and the assessment tasks, and
  6. The need for significant time to be spent engaged with the online environment.

There are probably more, but these are I think some of the significant issues.

So what, if anything, can be done to improve the completion rates for online learning. One thing that may have an impact is better designed, shorter content.  It is well documented that the best results from online learning come when students engage for short periods of time with material that is interesting and engaging.  Reading pages and pages of text, watching a series of videos or listening to long audio files, in order to be able to complete assessment activities is never, (and this has been shown to be the case) going to be successful.  The best E-learning around is short, targeted and subject specific.  The problem that exists then would seem to be how to we create best practice e-learning in the VET sector, where there is often a significant amount of information a students needs to engage with and understand in order to be able to complete assessment tasks.

Low digital literacy and inappropriate course choice go somewhat hand in hand and relate to large extent to the way in which students are recruited and inducted into their course of study.  to complete a course of study completely online requires a set of skills that are lacking in a lot of students.  I am not just talking about computer skills here either, there are a range of study skills which people who have studied previously pick up and are able to utilise when faced with undertaking independent online learning.  These are skills that are often lacking in a lot of potential students and in particular those who have either never studied or not studied for a substantial period of time.

This is of course where good support comes in.  Things like synchronous facilitator led online workshops, where online work is treated as a group activity in a similar way to normal face to face learning have a clear effect on student engagement, as do things like regular contact between students and trainers, which should be more than just a weekly phone call asking them how they are going, a simple easy way for students to chat with each other, exchange ideas and begin to feel like a cohort rather than individuals studying alone.  There are lots and lots of great things that can be easily done to improve the support around online learning, but it seems that at least some providers just are not doing this, they are just signing people up, giving them their log in details and ringing them every now and again to ask them how they are going, which is in my opinion not real support anyway.

As I said earlier, while I see place for online learning in the VET sector, online only programs are at least in my opinion not the way to go for the vast majority of students, at least not unless providers are willing to put in a lot more time and effort than they currently are.

 

anyway that’s just my opinion.

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About pauldrasmussen
Paul Rasmussen is one of Australia’s most widely read Vocational Education and Training Commentators. He provides deep, unbiased analysis and insights not only on topical issues, but also on the underlying structure and policy which supports the industry. His writing and analysis has been praised for its uncompromising and thought provoking style and its ability to focus on the issues of real importance to the sector. He has advised various government departments and ministers, training providers, public and private organisations, not for profits and small to medium enterprises on the VET sector and the issues and opportunities facing it. He is one of Australia’s most awarded learning professionals and a regular speaker at a range of conventions and forums. His extensive experience in vocational education, and learning and development coupled with formal qualifications in philosophy, ethics, business and education management allow Paul to provide a unique view of the road ahead and how to navigate it.

8 Responses to Can we improve online completion rates in VET

  1. Joseph Sanders says:

    Paul, I entirely agree with you.The lack of support and progressive feedback is woeful.It’s almost a case of deception.As you point out ,there are so many ways to improve the learning experience and outcomes.To me this another example poor due diligence and oversight,producing waste of money,and human casualties.I think E Learning has a place in VET,but that needs to be well defined and managed.

  2. basdenleco says:

    Basically e learning is only as good as the latest video game.
    E learning has a place especially for the adult self motivated and regulated learner.
    I found your article excellent and e learning can work as long as the facilitator is excellent and prepared to be on line and available.

  3. This fits well with my experience as both a distance trainer and a VET student. Maybe we should consider how many jobs there are which involve working on a personal laptop from home, with mainly online work tools, and freedom to work at any time 24/7. As Ken Robinson says, are we training students to do low-grade clerical work, or skills for the real world?

  4. Susan Neill says:

    Our company offers online VET training and has done so since 2008. You are right – e-learning does have to be innovative, use various teaching methods, encourage communication back to the RTO, monitor student progress carefully, follow up on slow progress and engage the student. The right material and support all cost money – which most of these current entrants to the industry do not want to do.

  5. bowestherese says:

    The only way I find to improve completion rates is to engage,engage, engage. I constantly follow my student’s progress, and send them tips and worksheets to progress their studies. I also chat and Skype them to build a positive student teacher relationship. It is time intensive, but it works.

  6. Mark Jones says:

    Hi Paul,

    Again an interesting topic. I have had the opportunity of creating e-learn platforms for quite a few corporate clients using moodle and other more proprietary platforms and regardless of how well structured e-learns are, this challenge of engagement raises its head every time. Conversely I won a couple of tenders to deliver blended learning solutions to small business owners geographically dispersed across key regional centres and the take-up and engagement was unsurpassed. A couple of factors here: One there was high need for the learning content, it was flexibly delivered through face to face sessions, weekly webinars and a library (repository) of supporting resources, and most importantly a high motivation factor (business continuity and success).

    Taking a quote out of your article below we embedded these principles into the delivery methodology…it was a No brainer… 250 participants and a 98% completion rate.

    Quote “Things like synchronous facilitator led online workshops, where online work is treated as a group activity in a similar way to normal face to face learning have a clear effect on student engagement, as do things like regular contact between students and trainers, which should be more than just a weekly phone call asking them how they are going, a simple easy way for students to chat with each other, exchange ideas and begin to feel like a cohort rather than individuals studying alone”.

    The myth of online learning been easier and more cost effective needs to be broken. Our reality was that without the blended approach supported by high levels of contact and engagement (time, people and money as resources), it would never have worked as effectively as it did.

    Subsequently this program was duplicated and modelled for other projects because it worked! (MJ)

  7. Marsh says:

    Does anyone know the exact formula the Total Vet Reporting or Det uses to calculate completion rates? We can all come up with our own formulas but be interesting what the Dept use to calculate this for RTO’s. The closest I could find is they use some sort of Markov chains theory which is great for big data not so good for individual RTO’s

  8. Pingback: It’s time to get our act together and make real time education a priority – EdTech.net.au

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