Budget, Budget, Budget

So unless you have been asleep, under a rock or like a lot of people plainly disinterested, the Turnbull Government handed down its latest budget on Tuesday night and if you want to pour through all of the documents associated with it they can be located here.  What I am primarily interested in looking however is the new ‘National Partnership agreement’ (NPA) namely the skilling Australians fund which will allocate funding to the states for vocational training, providing they ‘deliver on commitments to train more apprentices.

First things first.  Finally having a commitment (4 years) from the Federal government around the issue of the expiring NPA is a good and positive thing.  There were many at all levels in the sector who were worried deeply about what was going to occur when the old agreement expired and no provision was in place to bolster state financial commitments to the sector, there would have been large scale holes in the VET budgets of all of the states, making it an exceeding difficult time for both providers and potential students.

The devil as they say is in the detail and as yet, as we expect there is not a lot of that floating around.  I have to admit though that when I look at the budget speech itself, the portfolio statements from the department, and the media releases from Simon Birmingham and Karen Andrews and see the continuing usage of the word apprenticeship and less occasionally the term  traineeship, I worry slightly.  Don’t get me wrong here I think apprenticeships and traineeships are important and a vital part of the sector and that something needed to be done about the declining numbers I am worried slightly about how this language will cash out, primarily because in a range of market segments apprenticeships and traineeships are not the predominant model in terms of the delivery of qualifications to students.  I am also the first to admit, that this may simply be a language thing and that, the terms are in reality simply shorthand for VET funding models in general.  It could also mean that the feds will essentially foot the bill for user choice style training and that the states will be responsible for everything else, or it could mean the government is attempting to push the sector and industry towards these delivery models over other models. It is this last option which really concerns me particularly within the sector in which I primarily work, community services.  It is for the most part impossible to get a job in this sector in client facing roles without at the very least a certificate III, and given that there is a high level of casualisation and issues around staff retention both at organisational and industry levels, most organisations are reticent to look at traineeship models for either new or existing workers.  Significant numbers of employers simply make having the appropriate qualification a mandatory component of employment.  This means that for people wanting to enter the sector they either have to pay for it themselves or access funding under some form of entitlement model.  If this language spells a move away from entitlement models of funding then this would be a bad thing the community services sector particularly from a workforce capability standpoint particularly given the high numbers of staff that will be needed in the sector over the next few years.

Improving apprenticeship and traineeship levels is certainly important, however it can’t be done at the expense of other forms of funding which may have high levels of usage in certain market segments.  So I guess we will have to wait to see what comes out of all of this in the wash.

Anyway thats just my opinion

Advertisements

About pauldrasmussen
Paul Rasmussen is one of Australia’s most widely read Vocational Education and Training Commentators. He provides deep, unbiased analysis and insights not only on topical issues, but also on the underlying structure and policy which supports the industry. His writing and analysis has been praised for its uncompromising and thought provoking style and its ability to focus on the issues of real importance to the sector. He has advised various government departments and ministers, training providers, public and private organisations, not for profits and small to medium enterprises on the VET sector and the issues and opportunities facing it. He is one of Australia’s most awarded learning professionals and a regular speaker at a range of conventions and forums. His extensive experience in vocational education, and learning and development coupled with formal qualifications in philosophy, ethics, business and education management allow Paul to provide a unique view of the road ahead and how to navigate it.

One Response to Budget, Budget, Budget

  1. Alexis Watt says:

    Paul the narrative does seem to disregard the reality that you describe. This is possibly leakage of an as yet undisclosed agenda, or simplification and distillation of VET to the easier-to-understand and therefore easier-to-gain-political-mileage-from decline in apprenticeships over recent years. Once again the diversity and complexity of VET is overlooked or reduced for expediency or convenience, with scant regard to the implications that simplification has to large and critically important sectors of the population and the economy. It will indeed be interesting to see how this ‘cashes out’.

Let me Know what you think

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: