Time for reflection.

Well 2017 has been a big year.  It has been a big year for me personally and professionally, moving out of the world of VET (at least directly ) and into a more traditional learning and development role.  This was a little bit of a watershed moment for the year as I hadn’t realised the extent of what could be called background stress comes hand in hand with living and breathing the running of an RTO and being neck deep in the VET sector in general.  To be back in a more traditional Learning role, even though it has a different set of challenges and stresses, does not have that ongoing, background stress that I think so many of us in the VET sector feel almost constantly.

Even though I have moved away from the day to day of the VET sector, as most of you know, I have still tried to keep my finger at least somewhat near the pulse, which surprisingly has been a little easier when away from the general hustle and bustle.  It has been a pretty big year for the sector in a lot of ways, with the end of VFH and the start of VSL and all of the issues that bought along with it, including the demise of one very big player in the field, the WhiteCloud private equity backed Careers Australia as well as a number of other providers ranging in size from large to small.  We also saw the contraction of a number of markets areas, primarily due to the caps placed on student fees through VSL. We saw a number of scandals involving TAFEs, the biggest of which has clearly been the absolute failure of TAFESA and the SA government, along with reports showing that funding for VET has not only not kept up with university and school funding but has in actual real terms gone backwards.  When we add on top of this the TAE debacle once could be forgiven for being a little pessimistic about the sector.

Unlike when I wrote a similar piece to last year and the year before, where I talked about the fact that we would see, and did, major players both private and public either leave the market or take massive regulatory hits, I don’t think we are going to see the same thing happen over the next 12 months.  I think we are going to see a sector that rallies back, a rally driven by a greater focus on the needs of industry and workforce participation outcomes, rather than student numbers and qualifications.  The gaps in the system are evident and there now exists both the opportunity and the momentum to fix them.

On a personal note my humble little blog grew in size and reach, and the number of people who I have met through it and am delighted to call my friends always amazes me.  I personally learn a lot through both writing my blog and talking with those of you who comment on it both here and in forums like linkedin, and for the most part, even where there have been disagreements, they have been cordial, well considered and thought out.  I feel honored that so many of you read this thing that I started a little over six years ago and that so many of you find it valuable, even on those days when I let fly and have a bit of a rant.

To the more than 2,500 people who follow me on a regular basis across this blog, linkedin and other forums, I appreciate each and everyone of you, you provide me with insights, knowledge and a depth of wisdom for which I am truly grateful.

So I sincerely hope that all of you, no matter what you are doing over the next few weeks, have a deeply wonderful time, a time to unwind, relax, let go of the year that was and come back next year with a renewed vigor and vitality because I for one look forward to talking to you all again.

 

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About pauldrasmussen
Paul Rasmussen is one of Australia’s most widely read Vocational Education and Training Commentators. He provides deep, unbiased analysis and insights not only on topical issues, but also on the underlying structure and policy which supports the industry. His writing and analysis has been praised for its uncompromising and thought provoking style and its ability to focus on the issues of real importance to the sector. He has advised various government departments and ministers, training providers, public and private organisations, not for profits and small to medium enterprises on the VET sector and the issues and opportunities facing it. He is one of Australia’s most awarded learning professionals and a regular speaker at a range of conventions and forums. His extensive experience in vocational education, and learning and development coupled with formal qualifications in philosophy, ethics, business and education management allow Paul to provide a unique view of the road ahead and how to navigate it.

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