Changes to VET policies don’t just effect students

This month we have seen two massive announcements that have the potential to wide ranging effects on the landscape of Vocation Education in this country.  Both of these announcements, one in the Victorian budget and the other in the federal oppositions budget reply, were about cordoning off large sums of funding for the VET sector and making it exclusively available to TAFE.  There have been a number of pieces already written about the effects of these policy positions in terms of student choice, the capability of the public provider to be able to deliver these programs and a range of other issues.  Today however I want to look at an issue which has received scant if any real discussion.

Education in this country is big business and employs a enormous amount of people to service the needs of students and industry.  Approximately 225000 people are employed in various roles in the Vocational Education and training industry in Australia. What is truly interesting about this number is that only about one third of this workforce is employed by the public providers.  The other 150000 or so people who make up the VET workforce work for providers other than TAFE.  It would be convenient, if as some commentators would like to have the public believe, if all of these other providers were large, faceless, profit driven corporations, however that is simply not the truth of the matter.  The vast majority of these providers are small to medium business, owned and run by people passionate about delivering high quality educational outcomes, who have invested their own livelihoods into these endeavours,  and who employ equally passionate, trainers, assessors, compliance, admin and other staff.    In addition to this non-public providers deliver around 60% of all VET programs nationally and about 90% of all international VET enrollments (which alone is currently around a $20 billion market for Australia).  It also needs to be remembered that currently across the board the vast majority of government funding for vocational education (in excess of 70%) already goes into TAFE nationally.

While I have always held that Australia needs to have an effective and efficient public VET provider, what are, by their own admission, agenda driven policy positions such as those take by the Victorian government and proposed by the federal opposition, have the potential to do large scale harm to the non-public VET sector and its substantial workforce.   If non-public provider numbers were to shrink by just 10% there is the possibility of an additional 15,000 people becoming unemployed.  Now that is a huge number and a huge knock on effect on our economy, simply because politicians are concerned about their scared cows.

Some people have suggested that any employment losses in the non-public sector would be evened out by employment gains in the public sector as TAFE would need to take on more staff to cope with more enrollments.  This is simply not the case.  We have already seen quite widespread rationalisation of TAFE administrative workforces, in an attempt to reduce duplication of roles and services and to direct more of the government spend to education programs rather than administration.  When we also the effectiveness of elearning in delivering high quality outcomes with much higher trainer/student ratios that face to face deliver, it becomes an even stronger proposition that very few of those people currently employed in the non-public sector would be able to migrate to employment in the public sector.  It is not however just simply a matter of employment either, there are large numbers of what could be called mom&pop providers, small and micro providers who work in niche markets, who have invested their personal holdings in their business and for whom these business’s are their sole sources of incomes.  The destruction of these providers would have far reaching effects economically and socially.

So when we think about the policy decisions that are being made about the VET sector in this country, let’s, occasionally at least, spare a thought for the 150000 committed and passionate people who work in this sector but don’t work for TAFE.

 

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About pauldrasmussen
Paul Rasmussen is one of Australia’s most widely read Vocational Education and Training Commentators. He provides deep, unbiased analysis and insights not only on topical issues, but also on the underlying structure and policy which supports the industry. His writing and analysis has been praised for its uncompromising and thought provoking style and its ability to focus on the issues of real importance to the sector. He has advised various government departments and ministers, training providers, public and private organisations, not for profits and small to medium enterprises on the VET sector and the issues and opportunities facing it. He is one of Australia’s most awarded learning professionals and a regular speaker at a range of conventions and forums. His extensive experience in vocational education, and learning and development coupled with formal qualifications in philosophy, ethics, business and education management allow Paul to provide a unique view of the road ahead and how to navigate it.

4 Responses to Changes to VET policies don’t just effect students

  1. Brian Streitberger says:

    I 100% agree! Very well put.
    Thank you.
    It’s a shame that government won’t listen or can see the big picture.

  2. Simon Gray says:

    Hi Paul
    Great Article – we are a family business – one small to medium sized business who consistently deliver great outcomes for students and try to do things right. We have always complied with RTO rules and regulations and have been through many audits over the years.
    We have over 40 staff who are passionate about the industry and I believe truly want the best outcome for the students.
    There seems little interest in listening to the stories of many businesses in a similar position and the narrative now seems to be that all private RTO’s are dodgy and not providing great outcomes.

    • pauldrasmussen says:

      Simon,

      I couldn’t agree more. In fact there is a consistent attempt by a number of parties to make so much noise about so called dodgy providers that it is impossible for stories like yours to get any traction whatsoever.

  3. EDministrate says:

    Reblogged this on .

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