Changes to VET policies don’t just effect students

This month we have seen two massive announcements that have the potential to wide ranging effects on the landscape of Vocation Education in this country.  Both of these announcements, one in the Victorian budget and the other in the federal oppositions budget reply, were about cordoning off large sums of funding for the VET sector and making it exclusively available to TAFE.  There have been a number of pieces already written about the effects of these policy positions in terms of student choice, the capability of the public provider to be able to deliver these programs and a range of other issues.  Today however I want to look at an issue which has received scant if any real discussion.

Education in this country is big business and employs a enormous amount of people to service the needs of students and industry.  Approximately 225000 people are employed in various roles in the Vocational Education and training industry in Australia. What is truly interesting about this number is that only about one third of this workforce is employed by the public providers.  The other 150000 or so people who make up the VET workforce work for providers other than TAFE.  It would be convenient, if as some commentators would like to have the public believe, if all of these other providers were large, faceless, profit driven corporations, however that is simply not the truth of the matter.  The vast majority of these providers are small to medium business, owned and run by people passionate about delivering high quality educational outcomes, who have invested their own livelihoods into these endeavours,  and who employ equally passionate, trainers, assessors, compliance, admin and other staff.    In addition to this non-public providers deliver around 60% of all VET programs nationally and about 90% of all international VET enrollments (which alone is currently around a $20 billion market for Australia).  It also needs to be remembered that currently across the board the vast majority of government funding for vocational education (in excess of 70%) already goes into TAFE nationally.

While I have always held that Australia needs to have an effective and efficient public VET provider, what are, by their own admission, agenda driven policy positions such as those take by the Victorian government and proposed by the federal opposition, have the potential to do large scale harm to the non-public VET sector and its substantial workforce.   If non-public provider numbers were to shrink by just 10% there is the possibility of an additional 15,000 people becoming unemployed.  Now that is a huge number and a huge knock on effect on our economy, simply because politicians are concerned about their scared cows.

Some people have suggested that any employment losses in the non-public sector would be evened out by employment gains in the public sector as TAFE would need to take on more staff to cope with more enrollments.  This is simply not the case.  We have already seen quite widespread rationalisation of TAFE administrative workforces, in an attempt to reduce duplication of roles and services and to direct more of the government spend to education programs rather than administration.  When we also the effectiveness of elearning in delivering high quality outcomes with much higher trainer/student ratios that face to face deliver, it becomes an even stronger proposition that very few of those people currently employed in the non-public sector would be able to migrate to employment in the public sector.  It is not however just simply a matter of employment either, there are large numbers of what could be called mom&pop providers, small and micro providers who work in niche markets, who have invested their personal holdings in their business and for whom these business’s are their sole sources of incomes.  The destruction of these providers would have far reaching effects economically and socially.

So when we think about the policy decisions that are being made about the VET sector in this country, let’s, occasionally at least, spare a thought for the 150000 committed and passionate people who work in this sector but don’t work for TAFE.

 

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Free Training and the Value of Education

As everyone is no doubt aware by now in their latest budget the Victoria Labor Government has decided to spend $172 Million primarily to make 30 priority courses and 18 pre-apprenticeship programs free, if and only if you do them at a TAFE.  I have elsewhere expressed my view on this particular policy decision and won’t expand on that here, however the fact that we are already see articles on how to take advantage of this new initiative are concerning enough .  What I do want to discuss is the concept of value in educational programs and how that intersects with ideas such as completion rates, student contributions, choice, quality and monopoly behaviours.

Let’s take a look for a moment at the world of MOOCs (Massive online open courses), free courses, which anyone, anywhere can enrol in.  The completion rate is between 5 and 15% depending on whether you count simply finishing or completing assessments and receiving a certificate.  That’s a rate that makes even the approximately 40% completion rate for apprenticeships, we have in this country look good. One of the reasons for this that we can refer to these courses as ‘easy in, easy out’ as my good friend Ryan Tracey suggested. There is not real cost, or condition on entry and enrollment, and no cost or consequence for exiting or no completion.  Now of course there have been a plethora of other arguments made for why this is the case and MOOCs may not be a perfect mirror for vocational education.

What of university education then, where it could be argued there is still a fairly easy in, easy out scenario, depending on the course of study chosen and bearing in mind that there may be some debt consequences.  Again however there is not cost on actual admission to a course, tick a box on your admissions form and the ‘cost’ of our degree disappears into the nether world of FEE-Help. Yes you have to pay it back at some point, probably, however for the vast majority of students their accumulated HELP debt doesn’t even enter their minds until the tax department goes, hello were going to be taking your income tax return to pay for your loan.  On average,  approximately 30% of students fail to complete their university studies within six years of enrollment.

If we also bring into the frame the VET FEE-Help saga where we saw in some cases completion rates as low as 2%, the only reason brokers and the like were able to sign up such massive numbers of people and generate such huge sums of money was because there was no barrier to entry and in particular no cost component.  I am aware that this is a simplification, however imagine how different the VFH landscape would have been if there was a mandatory $100 sign up fee, paid by the student prior to their enrollment.

Now before anyone says it, I know that there are a lot of people out there who could afford to pay $100 on the spot to access an enrollment, that’s the point.  It is not to suggest that there should not be equality of access to education, an even playing field so to speak, something which I have argued for and supported in various roles and across a wide range of forums.  It is simply to suggest if there was a gateway condition which needed to be fulfilled prior to entry into a program, then some of the things which occurred may not have.  Enough of that though.

Successive Queensland governments have held the position that in all but specifically funded programs designed to engage with people with various disadvantages (Skilling Queenslanders for example) that all providers must charge a student contribution fee on all state government-funded training, whether it is User choice, Certificate III guarantee or something else.  Providers can choose what the level of contribution can be and it ranges from $50 to $1000+ depending on the course, the provider and the level of funding provided, but they must in all cases charge a fee and there must be evidence that, that fee was paid prior to commencement of the course.  This of course doesn’t suggest there are not a range of programs and other initiatives which are designed to assist people who are unable to afford even a smaller contribution fee, there are, however in all cases what this does, by either the person having to contribute themselves or meet secondary criteria is provide even a small gauge that the person has some level of commitment to the course of study they wish to undertake.

The other issue which comes up here is that of choice.  Should not students be able to choose whom they wish to study, to choose the provider who best suits their needs in terms of curriculum, modes of learning, content, units offered and quality of teacher staff and outcomes.   Surely that is not a lot to ask.  I can almost guarantee that the standard mode of delivery of the courses offered for free, will be the bog standard one of semester based, face to face classes, mostly daytime classes.  Which is of course the model which best suits, teachers and administrators rather than students, particularly those who are trying to support themselves as well as study.  But most of all why should students be starved of choice and forced to undertake their studies with particular providers, who may or may not be able, or willing to customise the qualification to suit the needs of the student and whose learning outcomes may not be as good as offerings from other providers who are not similarly funded.

We can have equitable access, an even playing field for people wishing to undertake high priority, skills shortage programs, without resorting to massively devaluing the outcomes of students and the hard work of stakeholders in the sector, it just requires we actually build a systematic non-agenda driven approach to how we fund these training programs.

Let’s talk about the system before we talk about funding.

There has been a number of articles and papers popping up recently which have discussed the need to reform post secondary training and education funding in Australia.  Now while certainly I would agree that this is an issue which we need to look at, and one which requires careful consideration, I can’t help but wonder if it isn’t a little bit of the tail wagging the dog.  Bear with me while I explain.

There is always a lot of discussion about how VET in this country is funded, who should get what, should it be more competitive or less, what should be funded, the list is endless and so is the opinion and verbosity about it.  Firstly don’t get me wrong, I think that discussions around how we fund post secondary education and in particular VET in this country are vital to our ability to be able to deliver high quality educational outcomes and ensure equality of access to education in this country.  However all of this talk of funding obfuscates the real problem that underlies the entire sector and that is the question of what is the purpose of the sector and what we need to do to ensure that we have a system that best addresses that purpose.  I would hazard to guess that if we took the approach of making sure the system and purpose of the sector were aligned that we would need to spend much less time thinking about the who, what, and how of funding as hopefully the answer to these questions would be apparent as a result of how the system worked.

For quite a long time I have held the position that when we look at the VET sector, its purpose is fairly clear and that is that the purpose of Vocational education and training is to designed to deliver workplace-specific skills and knowledge to assist participants to improve their workforce participation options.  Now over the years people have suggested that this concept is to narrow and that the purpose is to increase the overall levels of education with in the country, so that we have in general a smarter better educated populous, because education and learning are ends in themselves and not simply means.  While I have some sympathy with the position and generally that education and learning are important in and of themselves, this is not and should not be the central purpose of vocational education in this country.  It is certainly not the purpose for which the vast majority of students use it for.

it is clear from years worth of data collected by NCVER and other places that more than 80% of all participants in VET are seeking to convert their participation in the sector and subsequent qualifications to improve their workforce participation levels, either through getting a job or by improving or changing the job role that they currently have.  If the vast majority of participants in the sector are seeking workforce participation improvements and the sector is, pretty much by the definition of the words themselves (Vocational, Education, Training), about delivering workplace skills, then it seems clear, at least to me, that the main purpose of the sector should be what I outlined above ‘to deliver workplace-specific skills and knowledge to assist participants to improve their workforce participation.’

Given the purpose which I have put forward this gives us a fairly solid foundation from which to commence building a system to deliver on that purpose.  I don’t propose to do all of that here and now, but I will point out a few things which instantly seem to pop out.  The first is that there must be a connection between the knowledge and skills being learnt by the participant and the role they want to utilise them in.  No point in teaching someone underwater macrame if they want to an airline pilot or teaching a prospective printer how to work a Gutenberg Press. This means that there must be an intimate connection between industry, content, delivery and assessment.  It also needs that the system needs to be agile enough to cope with rapid changes in the skills and knowledge base of particular industries.

It also means that the system must ensure the validity, particularly in terms of competency, of any qualification issued.  Participants must be able to convert their qualifications into workforce outcomes and the only way that can effectively happen is if there is robust confidence in the competency outcomes of the qualification.  If as an employer I cannot guarantee that a person a particular qualification or  a qualification from a particular provider, then I am less likely to allow the conversion of that qualification into a workforce outcome, which in turn undermines the entire system.  In fact if workforce outcomes are the primary purpose of a VET system then the ability to convert qualifications into those outcomes is the lynch pin.

As i said I am not going to try and develop and entire basis for a system here, but as i said earlier, while discussions about funding are vital, we need to ensure that we have a system that supports the purpose of what the sector is trying to do first.

Private Equity, investment and consolidation in Vocational Education

A couple of days ago now the AFR posted an article about private equity and the Australian for profit education market, including Vocational education, in which they suggested ‘The Australian education sector is set to be the subject of a wave of consolidation led by private-equity looking to tap into its high-margins and predictable cashflow. Global strategic-advice company, EY-Parthenon, is gearing up to target the $25 billion for-profit education industry.’  The trouble is that I can’t help but think I have heard this all before.

During the middle and running through to the what was clearly inevitable end of now infamous VET Fee Help era, private equity firms, based on amazing high EBITDA margins, the lure of cashflow backed by government contracts, and an almost complete and utter misunderstanding of the VET industry in Australia, rush into the market and snatched up, partnered with or poured money into some of the biggest players in the educational market at the time all of which failed to produce the results which were way overhyped by ambitious CEOs, Managing Directors and founders looking to provide cashflow for expansion in a market which everyone, except it appears, the so call professional private equity gurus knew was a bubble soon to burst.

Now less than two years since the bubble well and truly started to burst and the demise of the vast majority of private equity backed providers, we see yet again a private equity strategy company selling the idea of investment in the Australian education business.  Admittedly EY-Parthenon and their Varun Jain and not limiting themselves to the VET market this time with their eyes on a more broad vista including early education, schools, VET and Universities. The problem for me is in statements such as such as the one where Mr Jain suggests that the fact that funding comes largely from the public sector, student fees and philanthropy is not something that he is concerned about, shows a think a deep misunderstanding of the volatility of the publicly post secondary education market in this country.  Post secondary education and particularly vocational education in this country has always been very much at the whim of the political winds and lean of whoever is currently in government.  I mean money always flows towards TAFE which of course could have more to do with gravity or perhaps more correctly inertia than anything else.  Then of course the spray which escapes from the main trickle is what is left for the non-public sector and exactly how much of a spray that is depends on some many thing that are out of the control of the operators of non-public RTOs.

So some of you are probably thinking now, why is he banging on about this.  It is simply because I am a little worried by this talking up of private equity again.  Not because I think that all education should be publicly delivered, the educational market should be as diverse as possible to allow for innovation and choice.  Nor do I care about private equity firms losing millions of dollars when the businesses they have invested in (without proper consideration most of the time in my opinion) fail.  Although I do care deeply about the effect that this has on both students and our sector workforce.  The concept of industry consolidation doesn’t present an issue for me either, as I do think the entire sector, public, private and not for profit, could do with a shake up and consolidation.

What worries me is that we have seen this before and we have seen the effects of it.  We have seen investors with little or no understanding of the education market in Australia and even less understanding of how to run an educational business, take substantial stakes in providers and because of their lack of knowledge and understanding drive their investment vehicles into practices and operations where their ability to deliver quality training and meet compliance needs are stretched to breaking point and beyond.  Roll ups, complex corporate structures, a focus on warm bodies rather than quality, all the things that force governments to enact changes to funding programs and harms the public’s view of the industry as a whole.

If you are a private equity firm (like EY-Parthenon ) please for a start do some real research, talk to people who are actually involved in the industry not just the usual crop of pundits, lobbyists, ex politicians looking a board seat and the like, because I can tell you that they knew like the rest of us about the issues around Vet Fee Help and market in general when the last crop of equity firms rushed in, they just didn’t bother to say anything.  Secondly if you are going to invest, again put people on your boards and in senior management roles who understand the market in this country and really understand the issues around training and assessment in our regulatory environment.  If you don’t then you are throwing good money after bad and damaging the industry in way you could not possibly understand.

 

Is it time for capstone or endpoint independent assessment in VET?

With a number of countries including the UK moving towards using some sort of capstone or endpoint assessment to act as a final gateway for apprentices, to confirm their competence, prior to being awarded their qualification,  it seems like it may not be a bad time for the Australian VET sector to look at the concept as well.

What is an endpoint or capstone assessment then?  It is an independent assessment  of the knowledge, skills and behaviours that have been learnt throughout the apprenticeship. The purpose of which is to make sure the apprentice meets the standard set by employers and are fully competent in the occupation.  If we take the UK for example End-point assessment must be administered by an assessor from an approved, independent End-point Assessment Organisation, and not by the training provider.  It is the simple idea that at the conclusion of the apprenticeship and prior to the awarding of the qualification an independent body, not connected to the training provider or the employer, makes a final assessment of the skills and knowledge of the apprentice to ensure that they have successfully learnt the skills required for the qualification and are therefore competent to be awarded the qualification.

The first question most people as when this suggestion is bought up is Why?  Why is there the need to have a separate independent organisation certifying the competence of the student, isn’t that what the RTO (public or not) is supposed to do.  Of course the simple answer here is that under our VET system that is correct, it is the RTO who is responsible for certifying the competence of the student and awarding the qualification.  However I think given the recent issues with both public and private providers and the fact that ASQA has had to either rescind or have reassessed a substantial number of qualifications across a range of industries, it seems at least to me, that confidence in the fact that providers are actually doing enough to ensure competence may actually be a significant issue.  That those students who receive qualifications, regardless of what industry it relates to, are actually competent and have the requisite skills and knowledge they require in order to do the work which the qualification says they are able to do, is really the bedrock of our system isn’t it.  If more than 80% of people undertaking VET are doing it to improve their workforce participation, then their ability to convert that qualification into some kind of workforce outcome, along with the need for employers who employ these students on the basis of having a qualification, which indicates they possess a certain level of skills and knowledge are paramount.  In fact we have seen a number of employers now feeling that they need undertake their own testing of ‘qualified’ potential staff to ensure their competence prior to employment.  The idea of end point assessments is I think one that is certainly applicable to apprenticeships, however I also think there is certainly a useful application for them across a range of disciplines.  There would also be an interesting side benefit of a system of independent assessment and that is that it would provide substantive information to the VET regulator around the quality of graduates from different providers.  A high level of failure of students from a particular provider would be a risk indicator for the regulator to cast a closer eye over that provider.  We would I think also see that those providers who were less that scrupulous in their training and assessment practices would begin to exit the market as it would become more difficult for them to sustain their business models.

There are a range of conditions however which these kind of assessments require to meet, in order I think to be both successful and valuable.  The first is true independence, these gatekeeper organisations cannot be connected to training providers in any way.  They cannot be part of the TAFE system or linked to private providers at all, they must be truly independent organisations.  I would also suggest that along with this goes the fact that they cannot be government agencies, because, unfortunately as we know, there are often competing pressures placed upon government agencies which may make them less effective in carrying out their duties.   A couple of suggestions then spring to mind, the first of which would be to utilise the various peak bodies for different industries as a conduit to enabling this sort of assessment.  To me there may be issues here as peak bodies are often tightly linked to, and in a substantial number of instances paid for by the employers they represent.  This may produce the perception of bias or making things easier, particularly when there are shortages in the labour markets they represent.  Another possibility would be to utilise the already existing SSO’s and simply add to their duties, the development and administration of independent end point assessments.  This suggestion makes a fair bit of sense to me as there are already existing organisations in place who are tightly linked to the development of the training packages themselves and who are already funded to provide a range of VET services.  The third option would be to not utilise any existing structures and build the system from the ground up with organisations applying for and being granted a license shall we say to deliver these assessment services.  Of course stringent requirements would need to be developed to ensure that the veracity of these organisations were not subject to even the perception of bias or unethical behaviour.

I know that there will be those of you out there who will say that all this is doing is creating another layer of bureaucracy, and that what is in fact needed more high quality providers who can be trusted in their practices, and less lets get this qualification done as quickly as possible providers in the system, and to be fair you are probably right.  The problem is, that what we are doing is not working, and if we are  honest has not been working for a while now, and suggestions like removing the contestable market place or only providing government funding to public providers or more regulation and harsher penalties will not, to my mind at least, make any substantial difference.  The concept of independent final assessments may however actually revitalise the levels of confidence that everyone has in the system.  It is I think at least something we should be talking about.

 

 

 

Vocational Education, Career Development and Employment

I went to a really interesting discussion hosted by ACPET last week centered on the theme, careers not courses.  As some of you may be aware this concept of career development, employment opportunity and workforce participation is a subject that I have viewed as quite important for a while now.  Too often we see post secondary graduates, whether from the VET sector or the University sector coming into the workforce either clearly not properly trained and assessed,  having not been taught particular units or subjects, or that the material they have been taught is out of date.  This therefore makes the student who was hoping that their qualification would net them a job when they were finished not actually capable of doing the role they are supposed to be trained for, yet not knowing that this is the case.  So they submit resumes and go to interviews (when they get past the resume stage) and almost never understand why they don’t get the role.  There are also a not insignificant number of people who get to the end of their study, get into the role they are trained for and find out rapidly that it is just not what they expected or what they want to do.

Of course when you start to think about this issue it becomes really obvious that there is no quick fix here.  It is caused by a number of different failures throughout the system.  The first failure point if that of the mismatch between qualifications, and the requirements of industry and employers, and this is certainly not an issue which can or will be fixed overnight.  It is also one which has a more significant effect in some industries, particularly within fast-moving industries, than in others, but given that training packages define the parameters of the training to be delivered and changing them has traditionally be a long slow process and one in which industry and employers have not stepped up as much as they could have it would seem that this issue may be difficult to address in the short-term.

There are a couple of things which I think can be done, at least more easily than reconnecting training packages and industry, and that is this idea of career development or advice and using that advice and its outcomes to inform training programs, units of competency and placements, so that it maximizes the opportunity for the student to both understand the role they are being trained for, and their ability to actually be hired and function in that role.  The question then becomes how do we achieve, how do we map qualifications, training, and student outcomes, with industry or employment need.

The first step is that people who are giving advice to potential students, particularly where those students are younger, actually need to understand both the training industry and landscape, and they need to understand the requirements of industry or the roles that they are advising people about.  The sad state of affairs is that for the most part this is not the case, at best they have one but not the other.  There are a few notable exceptions of course, but still at the moment they are exceptions nothing more.  Why? Well that is a relatively easy answer, the vast majority of people who are advising potential students are employed by job agencies, apprenticeship and traineeship providers, or educational providers (RTOs for example).  They are not in a real sense career advisers, their real role is something different, either placing people into training programs, or placing them in employment.  Their function and agendas may not be as student centric as we might like to think.  Of course as with everything I am generalising here and there are certainly, for want of a better word, advisers, who are student centric and seek to develop a relationship with the potential student which will provide that person with as good an outcomes as possible.

The other part of the equation here is the training providers.  Training providers need to understand the employment market into which their graduates will be entering.  They need to understand the skills and knowledge and the units of competency which best fit the industry or part of the industry into which the student wants to work in, and more importantly that knowledge needs to be current and accurate.  They need to understand the set of units, and the knowledge and skills which come out of those units, which will maximise the students potential to work in the area they want to.  The problem is of course that there are a lot of courses out there, particularly in the business and community services area, but in other areas as well, where the units taught and the content of those units is so generic that it virtually prepares the student for nothing at all except for a long list of rejected resumes.  One of the reasons why, in a previous role, the organisation i was with had its own RTO was to ensure that the units covered in the course, their content, how they were delivered, and what was expected during placements etc was controlled and produced graduates with the right set of skills to move directly into employment in the organisation.  We also did extensive pre-enrollment testing and discussions to ensure that the people entering the course were a good fit and were likely to complete.  Now I know that some of the apprenticeship agencies and job agencies (some of the better ones) are doing this.  Testing candidates to see how they cope with change and to look for what careers might suit them the most.  And this sort of activity is vitally important because, just because a year 12 student says he likes to play video games and wants to be a game designer, does not mean that it is the best choice for him, (the game design industry in Australia directly employs only about 900 people btw) and may actually harm his chances of getting meaningful employment or doing further training to change careers later, due to impacts upon funding.  It is really important to note here that I am not suggesting that we need to stream and railroad people out of careers that they actually wish to undertake, I am just suggesting that there a lot of people who are being trained who really don’t understand the nature of the industries or work that they are being trained for, and if they had been provided with a fuller explanation of the various careers which were available to them may have chosen a very different path.

The other thing which is important here and is which often overlooked is the fact that industry needs to come to the party as well, they need to be clear about what skills and knowledge they require of potential employees and work with providers to deliver on those skills and knowledge.

Unless we have these links between industry, providers and advisors, greater knowledge of options and the effects of various options on future choices, and truly independent advisors, it seems difficult things will improve.  What we need is an ecosystem, where the potential students are getting, timely, independent, accurate and individualised advice, which leads them to providers who create individualised learning plans for these students, based on what the student wants and what industry needs, with placements, internships and other pre-employment opportunities offers by employers to provide student with well-rounded experiences and the best possible opportunity to convert their qualification into a workforce outcome.

 

 

ASQA: A divided and broken system of regulation

Back on the 20th of September I posted a piece entitled ‘One set of rules for all providers?‘, suggesting that far from it being the case, as ASQA so vehemently pronounces, that there is one set of rules for every provider regardless of there size, or whether they are publicly or privately owned, the State owned providers are treated far more leniently than any private provider and given access to modes of rectification which are simply not available to non-public entities.   So now six weeks or so later and after the lapse of the month deadline TAFESA was supposedly given by ASQA to rectify the debacle that was, and probably still is their training and assessment practices what has happened?

NOTHING!

Why has nothing happened you may well ask, and that really is the burning question here.  But first let me remind everyone that the last sanction listed on the ASQA decisions database against a TAFE was back in 2012.  So why time and time again do we see public providers, TAFEs, being caught out breaching the RTO standards, having poor, or in some cases it appears non-existent assessment practices and never do we see any of these breeches met with any sanctions.  We see this because despite what ASQA might claim and want us to believe, the regulatory system for the VET sector in this country is broken and divided and certainly not one system for all.  In fact I am amazed that ASQA representatives can claim that all providers are treated the same with a straight face, when there is overwhelming evidence that this is not the case.  The issues with TAFE SA alone are enough to show this.  If the level of non-compliance that has allegedly been found there was found at a non-public provider, they would have been deregistered by now. Will that happen to TAFE SA?  Not a chance, they will apologize, say that have changed their systems and processes and will do better, and at worse they might stop delivering some of the programs for a few months, but then it will be straight back to business as if nothing has happened.

How then have we got to a system that is so broken and so badly weighted against non-public providers.  To be fair at least some of it is our own fault.  As a sector we saw the issues of VET Fee Help and the actions of the Careers, ACNs and Pheonixs and we (or at the very least those bodies who were supposed to be acting on our behalf) didn’t speak up or take action against them.  This of course played into the hands of the media and those like the AEU and others whose agenda is to end non-public delivery of VET, by giving them ammunition to smear the entire sector.  So bad were the excesses of the few that Ministers had little choice but to react with a big stick, if for no other reason than to save their own political skins.  If we then add to this the fact that TAFEs are state owned entities, which the state utilises not simply as educational facilities but as weapons of policy enactment across a range of areas, and in  addition so heavily heavily unionised, that whenever something happens which the unions don’t like, the social media storm which erupts is of category five proportions.  It is no wonder the system is broken. Any minister or even the regulator itself that ever suggested closing or curtailing the activities of a TAFE due to non-compliance, would be met with such a media storm, both through traditional and social channels, that it is unlikely they would emerge with their skins, let alone their careers, still intact.  So as a result of this we now have a system of regulation which is deeply skewed in favour of the public provider and which actively over regulates and over sanctions private providers while all the while claiming this is not the case.  ASQA has become a political weapon rather than a fair and equitable regulator.

So what is the answer?  It is simply that peak bodies like ACPET need to step up and call out this atrocious and unfair treatment and the inequity which exists, because this is supposed to be a level playing field and ASQA is supposed to treat all providers the same.  In fact everyone needs to step up, everyone needs to voice our opinions and call out these issues.  We need to embarrass and force the regulator to do its job properly and the government to let it.  Lone voices in the wilderness are not enough here.  If as non-public providers you want to actually see some change to this, if you actually want to be treated fairly, you, yes you, need to step up and you need to force those bodies that are supposed to represent you to step up as well.  Create a storm on social media, don’t let the news stories die, be loud.  Why do you think so many people believe the rhetoric from the AEU, it’s not because they are right it is just because they are loud.  And if you don’t step up then this situation will continue because no one else is going to do anything about it.

Anyway that’s just my opinion.

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