Higher level teaching degrees and VET

So as many of you are aware there has been some new research which has come out about degree qualifications and teaching in VET.  Now it is important to note that I have not at this point had an opportunity to look over the entire study and the conclusions that it draws, however given the information which is available there are at least some questions I think are worth airing.

Firstly however a comment, I always find it interesting when academics suggest that VET needs better teaching qualifications when most academics don’t have any formal teach qualifications at all, they are simply experts (they have a PhD or similar) in their field. So I always tend to think that if University ‘teachers’ are considered to be capable because they have experience in their field, why is their this suggestion that it should be different in VET. Some if not most of the VET people who get the best outcomes for their student are those with the deepest industry experience and currency.  So with that little comment out of the way.

My first worry here is study size and knowing who it was that the survey was sent to.  570 and 360 respondents out of a supposedly 80,000 strong workforce seems a little low to me to be jumping to conclusions from.  I mean that is after all less than 1% of the total workforce.  My other initial concern is who it was sent to.  I don’t think I ever remember seeing anything about this survey anywhere or anyone at all mentioning that it was underway.  I could be wrong or my memory could be going, but if anyone out there got an invitation to respond to the survey let me know I would be really interested.  I am interested because, often these studies do not cover what could be called a definitive cross-section of the industry.  I am reminded of some research done around supporting students with disabilities which was presented a NCVER No Frills a number of years back, where it turned out that the researcher had only spoken to TAFE providers about how they dealt with disabled student and when asked why she had not contacted any non-public providers her utterly ill-informed answer was ‘private providers don’t deal with students with disabilities so there was no point in asking them’.  Now I am not saying something like that has occurred in this survey, but it would be really interesting to see if all of the parts of the sector had been able to give input and if it had covered all of the states.

Now I come to the real question I have about this paper, what is the evidence for a statement like  “Whether it was in VET pedagogy or something else, a degree or above really made a difference to things like a teacher’s professionalism, their contribution to the organisation and a deep understanding of the necessity of audit procedures.”  Is it just anecdotal or is there something more substantive.  Is it based on the response from teachers themselves saying they thought it made a difference or is there some other more shall we say robust data, or even feedback from their managers and employers about how their professionalism or contribution increased as a result of undertaking a higher degree.  I mean the cynic in me always says, if I had paid a significant sum of money for a degree and someone asked me if it was worthwhile, people are mostly going to say yes, even if it wasn’t just to appear to not appear to have made an error in judgement.

All that aside however, it is important to note that I am not against people in VET getting higher level degrees, nor am I against the concept of these degrees. I do however think that any change in policy to suggest that higher level qualifications become the standard or the entry point should be resisted wholeheartedly.  What VET needs is people who are highly experienced and appropriately qualified in their fields, who are passionate about passing that knowledge on to students and consistently ensure that they are current and well versed in industry practice.  Then we need to provide them with appropriate training qualifications to be able to effectively pass that information on and to assess the competence of students effectively.  That is what this sector needs not more people with degrees, who haven’t actually been in the industry for years because they have been to busy getting their degree.

Here’s an idea, before any more academics tell the VET sector what is good for it and that having university teaching degrees will raise the standard of teaching, how about we change university policy and force all academics who are teaching at university to have higher level teaching degrees and lets see how well that goes down.  I still remember that idiot academic last year complaining that he wasn’t being allowed to teach in the VET sector because he didn’t have a certificate IV TAE, even though he had a PhD in his field.  Just because you have  PhD in something doesn’t mean you can actually teach what you know to anyone.

Anyway that’s just my opinion.

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Oh What a Year its been!

When I think back over the last year, it really has been quite a big one for the sector.  So as the holiday season approaches and as I probably will not be updating my blog as regularly again until January, I thought I might consider the year past and the year ahead.

As just about everyone knows, in fact I think it would be difficult to find anyone in this country who didn’t have an opinion on VET at the moment it has been in the news so much, the sector has been in turmoil for a pretty lenghty period of time.  I remember Rod Camm talking at the Queensland ACPET Christmas party last year and saying he both thought and hoped that the worst was behind us.  However with ACN going into administration, Aspire college and the rest of the Global Intellectual holdings disappearing overnight, Careers Australia and the ACCC decisions and agreements, and Ashley Services looking very shaky at the moment it has not been a great year, particularly at the top end of town.  Not that small to medium sized providers were immune either with quite a few either leaving the sector voluntarily or because they could simply not sustain their businesses anymore.  Add to this massive uncertainty about the future of the sector during a very very long general election race, what would happen to VET FEE Help and the debacle of the new Certificate IV in Training and Assessment qualification and this year has been a cracker.

Enough bad news for the time being though.  What have been the positives for the year? Well, whether we like it or not there is now a replacement to the troubled VFH system, VET Student Loans, so at least there now exists a level of certainty around the that portion of the market. A large proportion of those providers who were doing the wrong thing have now either left, been forced out, or either been fined or in the process of being chased by the ACCC and others.  Simply removing these providers from the pool can only help to improve the quality and perception of the sector.  In terms of large scale good news that is about it, however I have seen so many providers this year, working so hard to create outstanding outcomes for their students and clients and when we look at the research and figures from NCVER we can see that overwhelmingly, this sector does a fantastic job and contributes so much towards the Australian economy and workforce.

So what about next year? Let’s just say that I think the roll out of VSL will be an interesting (the Chinese curse kind of interesting) space to watch.  With stricter entry requirements, loan limits for students, variable caps for providers depending on completion rates and a raft of other things, a lot of providers who were VFH providers or who might have been considering moving in that direction are viewing it as simply falling in the too hard basket and won’t be seeking approval to deliver.  The National Partnership agreement on skills reform, up for renegotiation as the current on expires in June 2017 seems currently if not dead in the water, leaking severely, with the states calling for a one year extension to the current agreement and the Federal government pretty much saying no.  No NPA would basically leave most of the state budgets for training with holes of around $100 Million  plus.

In terms of providers and the market itself, I also dont think we are out of the woods yet in terms of closures, restructures and downsizings.  It seems to me, as an outsider, that Ashley Services may have a very hard time trading out of the position it is currently in, at least in its current form.  There are also a number of other providers who had grown substantially on VFH incomes who will see those incomes slashed by in some cases 50-75% even if they are given approval to deliver under the new VSL system.  This will mean in most cases that there will be little chance of them continuing in their current forms and closures or restructures in terms of both staff and delivery will need to occur.  Is this a bad thing?  Yes and No.  Clearly there are probably some providers who expanded rapidly, did not deliver and did not properly invest in their continuing existence and the market may well be better off without them.  The down side of course is much wider than that, fewer available places and less choice for students, quality VET staff finding themselves unemployed or moved to contract and part time, casual work. There may also in some areas be knock on effects in terms of skilled workers in certain areas over the coming years.  So while there is a need to make sure that providers are meeting their requirements and delivery quality outcomes to their students and stakeholders, there is also a need to ensure that happens while we keep an eye on the wider picture and the impacts the VET has more generally.

Next year will be a year for consolidation and restructuring throughout the sector at all levels, a year of readjustment and reevaluation.  A year where we will see the number of providers, particularly at the bigger end of town shrink considerably both in number and size, but also hopefully a year in which the sector can reestablish itself and begin to move forward.

Anyway that’s just my opinion.

Thank you all for reading and interacting with this little slice of me for the year and thank you to all the friends both near and far I have made or held onto over the past year.  May you all enjoy whatever it is that you do over this time of year and all return happy and safe in the new year.

Paul

Quality of assessments in VET Discussion paper – A discussion.

So the Federal government has just released its discussion paper on Quality Assessments in VET.  This is part of some ongoing movements around the Certificate IV in TAE and other matters that has seen the new qualification being held back while the powers that be see what they can do about the perception at least, that there is a significant problem with how assessments are being carried out in the sector.

My initial comments on this are simple.  There is nothing wrong with the Certificate IV in Training and assessment, particularly as an entry-level qualification into the sector.  The problems with assessments in my opinion have very little to do with the Qualification and a whole lot to do with;

  • Inappropriate delivery and assessment of the qualification itself by unscrupulous providers simply out for a quick buck, and
  • pressure being put on trainers and assessors to ensure that people are deemed competent, again by unscrupulous providers out for a quick buck.

The problem here is not the qualification.  The problem lies squarely at the feet of providers themselves.  If the TAE is delivered and assessed properly, and the assessment processes within providers were up to scratch then there would be no issues.  The Department, ASQA and the sector itself needs to man up and end the shonky delivery of this qualification.  We all know whose TAE qualifications aren’t worth the paper they are printed on, but no one seems to want to do anything about it,  and when someone suggests that we do, the old catch cry of not more regulation leaps out of the woodwork.

 

Now that I have got that out of the way let’s have a look at the questions/proposals in the first half of the discussion paper.

  1. RTO Limitations
    • Is it appropriate for large number of RTOs to deliver the TAE qualification – NO.  The TAE should be a qualification for which obtaining approval to deliver is a rigorous process, including having not just the assessment tools, and staff audited, but also to have the delivery of the program audited.  TAE should be a special scope item outside of other areas as it is the key component within the system.  The number of RTOs delivering the qualification should be reduced by ensuring that there is a heavy and continuing compliance and regulatory burden on any RTO that decides to place a TAE qualification on scope.
    • Should RTOs be restricted from issuing to their own trainers and staff – NO.  If the audit and compliance system is rigorous enough there should be no problems with issuing to internal staff.
    • Should TAE be available through RPL – YES.  There are significant number of people within this sector who are highly skilled and whom undertaking a full assessment process whenever there was a package change would be overly burdensome.  Again if the regulatory controls are right RPL is appropriate.
    • Should TAE only be delivered by practitioners with a specific period of training and assessment within the Sector – YES.  At least 2 years FTE.
    • VET trainers should have higher qualifications – YES.  Anyone training the Certificate IV TAE, should hold that qualification plus and additional higher level qualification relation to VET.
    • Should there be a practical component – YES.  There should be either a work placement (for those not currently employed) or evidence of work (for those currently employed).  It does have to be long 50-80 hours would be more than sufficient.   This would ensure that graduates had actually spent time with real students and undertaken real assessments.
    • Should participants in TAE be employed in the sector prior to entering the course – NO.  This would overly constrict entry into the sector of people who might otherwise be able to undertake a TAE course and become quality additions to the sector.
  2.  Skills and Qualifications of Trainers
    • Should a design and development unit be made a core part of the Certificate IV and would this improve outcomes – NO and NO.  Including a unit on design and development would do very little to improve student outcomes at a certificate IV level.  Design and development of assessment tools is skill which is above the AQF level of a certificate IV.  Assessment tools should not be being designed by someone who only holds the entry-level qualification unless that person has substantial experience within the sector and in relation to design and development
    • While there should be some weight given to majority considerations, these majority considerations should be tempered strongly with the views of key stakeholders (as long as those key stakeholders are chosen wisely) and the strength of the arguments made.  The idea of who are the key stakeholders for the TAE is an interesting one to ponder.  I believe there needs to some representation from the sector itself, but which must include representation from both the coal face of delivery through to RTO/provider management.  There must also be strong representation from government (The department of education) as they are the major stakeholder in this (you can disagree with me if you like).  In the long run it is the government who is the ultimate customer for the vast majority of VET work that occurs, be that through funding or loans, or special purpose project or what ever.  The system belongs to the government so it is the major stakeholder.    Now I know that there are going to be calls here for the unions (AEU etc) to be involved and the academic VET research set, but in the long run the decisions about the TAE have to be made by the sector itself and the government, others can have input and ideas and the decision should and must sit with these two groups.
  3. VET Professional association
    • Is there a need to have a national VET professional association – YES.  This to me is a no brainer, of course there should be.  Should membership be mandatory in order to work in the sector, yes, but there needs to be levels.  So the first would be an associate member shall we say which would be open to anyone who had a TAE with very little additional in the way of requirements.  From there, various level could exist depending on the experience of the person, continuing professional development, independent evaluation of their work and skills etc.  This would make it easy to delineate between those at the top of the profession and those just beginning and would also encourage the continuing improvement of skills.  There should also be categories for  Trainers/Assessors, Management, compliance etc and a person should be able to be in multiple categories.
    • The big barrier to this is of course money.  It would either need to be funded by the government or it would need to be a membership fees based process.  The problem with being funded is obvious, in that money would be need to be found somewhere.  With membership fees two things would need to happen, one, it would need to be ensured that membership was not just a you pay your money you get your piece of paper deal or there would be no point.  On the other hand the process would need to not  be overly convoluted or expensive as this may be a disincentive to gaining higher levels of membership.
  4. Activities of a VET Association
    • It needs to be a register of VET practitioners
    • Develop and implement a CPD system for the sector
    • Approve professional development activities for CPD points
    • Promote VET sector work as an attractive career path.
    • While these activities need to be coordinated at a National level, but in particular the CPD program could be achieved through existing groups and or other external structures which were approved as CPD
    • There are a number of bodies with significant sectoral membership which could be utilised.  One example would be ACPET, although this might be met with resistance from the public sector, another might be something along the lines of AITD, which is already a membership organisation for the learning and development sector and which has a significant number of VET sector members.  In addition a private sector organisation like VELG which already has a solid VET membership base may also be an option in this area.
  5. Models for a VET association
    •  I have a preference for the type B model, it is the simplest, funding can be easily accounted for, and maintenance and management of registration and CPD needs to be held centrally anyway in my opinion.
    • While model A has advantages in that it takes into account things which already exist, I think it would be too hard to manage overall and membership would not be centralised.
    • Model C is simply a registration model as far as i am concerned and would add nothing to the sector.

Well so there you have it, my thoughts on at least the first half of the paper.  I will make some comments on chapter two of the paper later in the week.

Should the TAE qualification have prerequisites?

So as some of you know there has been a lengthy discussion around the new yet to be endorsed Certificate IV in Training and Assessment and one of the things that has come into my mind is around the reasons why people enroll into the qualification and what it is that they want to train after they gain the qualification.

I have over the years encountered a wide variety of people who when I have asked them the question ‘why do you want to do the TAE?’ have answered ‘I want to be a trainer’ which is I guess fair enough until they are asked what it is that they want to train or what skills they have that they want to pass on and they are unable to actually articulate what is it they want to train, they just want to be a trainer.  I have on some occasions where this has happened actually suggested to the person that perhaps we weren’t the best place for them and that another provider might be a better fit for them as we were really focused on what it was they wanted to train people in and working with that.

This all got me thinking, should there be prerequisites for entry into the Certificate IV in Training and Assessment and if we think so, what should they be?  So here is a swing at what it might look like;

  1. Hold a VET sector qualification or
  2. Hold a University level qualification and have substantial workplace experience (at least 3 years) in a relevant VET area, or
  3. Have substantial workplace experience (5+ years) in a relevant VET area.

Why these prerequisites?  Well that is simple under the standards you need to be able to show (small c remember) vocational competencies at, at least the level you want to train and without holding the qualification or having workplace experience that is going to be difficult in my opinion at least.

Now I can hear some people saying, but what about those people who don’t want to train VET sector qualification?  My first question  is well why are these people even considering the TAE qualification? I know the answer mostly has to do with the fact that most employers now set the qualification as a requirement for L&D people even if they aren’t delivering accredited training, but why that is, is a whole other story.  So let’s just put that aside for a moment.  The TAE in its current form is designed for people who are going to be delivering VET qualifications, all of the units on assessment and validation should at the very least be a giveaway.   If you are not going to be assessing then perhaps a course more focused on delivery and design (there are plenty out there) or one of the skills sets might be a much better option.  My second question is then the same as my earlier when, what are they going to train and again if they can’t articulate what it is they want to train, or don’t have substantial experience in an area, then I find it really difficult to see why you want to undertake the program.

Anyway that’s my opinion.

A registration board for the VET sector?

Do we need a Trainer and Assessors registration board?

 

After my previous post and a number of comments and discussions in a variety of forums, I got to thinking about this idea of a registration board for Trainers and Assessors in the VET sector.  Now I know this idea has been floated before, and that there are several groups out there who have or are attempting, as membership organisations, to utilise this idea to lift the general level of professionalism in the industry.  But lets face facts, unless membership of an organisation is linked to some kind of regulated authority to train, then there is always going to be a systematic failure.  There are registration boards for Teachers in all of the states, statutory bodies, set up to regulate and determine who is appropriately qualified and suitable to teach in a our primary and secondary school systems,  so do we need something like that?  A single national registration board for all trainers and assessors in the VET sector.    While I think in the long-term that might be a very good idea, I think there might be an alternative which at least in the shorter term may have a significant effect on the professionalism of the industry.

A registration board for all Trainers and Assessors delivering a Training and Assessment Qualification!

So if you want to be able to train others in the Certificate IV in Training and Assessment or above or any qualification from the TAE package, you would need to be registered by a single national board which provided you with an Authority to Train.  It should like most other boards of its ilk, charge membership fees which would be used to cover the expenses of running the board, and have clearly defined membership entry and maintenance requirements.  These requirements should revolved around skills and knowledge as well as experience.  Imagine the difference that would be made overnight if the ‘TAE registration board’ required 5 years of training experience before you were able to apply for membership to allow you to deliver a TAE qualification.  Gone instantly would be the incidents of doing a weekend TAE this weekend and then teaching the same class the next weekend.  A skills and knowledge component, perhaps an exam could be added into the mix for initial registration, as well as strong on going CPD requirements including delivery thresholds, peer supervision and mentoring requirements, then add to this penalties for non-compliance including suspension and de-registration and even just at this level, directly aimed at those teaching TAE qualifications this would have a rapid and marked effect on the quality not only of the TAE suite of programs, but a knock on effect to all other qualifications as well. This added to increased regulatory pressure at an organisational level would should see the quality of the qualification and the sector lifted quickly.

Now people might argue against this proposal in a number of ways.

This is industry is already over regulated

I am not sure of this for a start, but even so the vast majority of regulation at this point in time sits at the level of the RTO.  Trainer registration sits at a personal, not organisational level.  It is something that is managed by a person for themselves.  Individuals can choose whether or not they wish to be registered and have an Authority to Train or not.  Trainers and Assessors not delivery TAE qualifications would not be required to undertake registration, although there could either initially or over time a registration process developed for those who did not deliver TAE products.

The cost of a TAE qualification would go up

Probably, but is that a bad thing?  Is a $300, 2 day, Certificate IV in Training and Assessment really worth the money it is printed on for anyone?

Who would run it

The simple solution in my mind would be the regulator (ASQA).  Given that it needs some kind of regulatory force behind it to be effective, it either needs to be the current regulatory body or some of other statutory body.  I suppose it could be an independent organisation, but issues of continuity always concern me in these cases.

It is another expense for the Trainer 

I, as I think most reputable training organisations would be more than happy to pay the registration fees and associated costs of our TAE trainers or in terms of a new employee who came with registration, renewals of the registration for as long as they worked for us.  However that aside it would be an expense, yes, but it seems one that anyone who was interested in the quality of training and assessment would be willing to pay.

 

The single most important thing about this however, is that it needs to have regulatory force, it needs to be built into the standards that Training providers delivering TAE qualification may only employ registered trainers to deliver those qualifications.  No working under supervision arrangements or anything like that, you either have the registration and the authority to train or you don’t and if you don’t you can’t be employed in a role relating to the delivery of TAE qualification.

 

Anyway that’s just my opinion.

 

 

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